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Psalms 8:2

Out of the mouth of babes and infants have you ordained strength because of your enemies, that you might still the enemy and the avenger.
All Commentaries on Psalms 8:2 Go To Psalms 8

George Leo Haydock

AD 1849
Praise. But why does the prophet take notice of this proof of Christ's being the Messias, while he passes over his curing the sick? St. Chrysostom answers, because the other miracles had been performed in the old law, but God had never before opened the mouths of infants to proclaim "praise the Lord "as they did when they bore witness to Christ entering the temple. Other commentators greatly weaken this proof. (Berthier) We read that after the passage of the Red Sea, wisdom opened the mouth of the dumb, and made the tongues of infants eloquent; (Wisdom x. 21.) which may be a figurative expression. The prophets and apostles, whom the world looked upon as fools, were chosen to declare the highest mysteries. All nature so clearly proves the existence of Providence, that, if other things were silent, infants would open their mouths to confound the incredulous. The condition of man from his infancy is, in effect, one of the plainest proofs of the divine wisdom. His imitative powers, the ease with which he takes his mother's milk, are something surprising. Hippocrates even, concludes hence, that the child must have sucked, even in the womb, as the art is soon lost, and not easily recovered. God seems to be particularly pleased with the praises of children, Micheas ii. 9., and Joel ii. 16. St. Augustine admires how the Scriptures have been proportioned to the capacity of infants. Hebrew, "Thou hast founded strength. "(Aquila) (Calmet) But St. Jerome retains praise, as our Saviour himself quotes it, Matthew xxi. 16. (Haydock) Avenger. The old Vulgate read defensorem (Haydock) in the same sense. St. Chrysostom explains it of the Jews; and other Fathers understand heretics and the devil. (St. Augustine) (Calmet) Arnobius (contra Gent. i.) seems to think that all have an innate idea of Providence, ingenitum. The poor and simple confessed Christ, whom the proud doctors of the law, and Pharisees, rejected, despising his followers as children or fools. (Haydock)
2 mins

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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