2 Thessalonians 1:3

We are bound to thank God always for you, brethren, as it is fitting, because your faith grows exceedingly, and the love of every one of you all toward each other abounds;
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Ambrosiaster

AD 400
Paul adds in a fitting manner, so that they testify that great thanks must be given to God for such an infinite gift.

Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
There could be no merit in men’s choice of Christ, if it were not that God’s grace precedes any faith or action on their part in his choosing them. This is why the apostle Paul pronounces to the Thessalonians this benediction, “The Lord make you to increase and abound in love toward one another, and toward all men.” This benediction to love one another he gave us, who had also given us a law that we should love one another. Then, in the salutation addressed to the same church where some of its members possessed the disposition which he had wished them to cultivate, Paul says, “We are bound to thank God always for you, brothers. This is quite fitting, because your faith grows robustly, and your mutual charity abounds.” . ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
We are bound to give thanks to God always for you, brethren, even as it is meet. Again a sign of great humility. For he led them to reflect and consider, that if for our good actions others do not admire us first, but God, much more also ought we. And in other respects too he raises up their spirits, because they suffer such things as are not worthy of tears and lamentations, but of thanksgiving to God. But if Paul is thankful for the good of others, what will they suffer, who not only are not thankful, but even pine at it. For that your faith grows exceedingly, and the love of each one of you all toward one another abounds. And how, you say, can faith increase? That is when we suffer something dreadful for it. It is a great thing for it to be established, and not to be carried away by reasonings. But when the winds assail us, when the rains burst upon us, when a violent storm is raised on every side, and the waves succeed each other— then that we are not shaken, is a proof of no ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
And how, you say, can faith increase? It does so when we suffer something horrible for the sake of faith. It is a great thing for faith to be solidly established and not to be carried away by some sophistry. But when the winds assail us, when the rains burst upon us, when a violent storm is raised on every side and the waves follow upon one another, that fact that we are not shaken is a proof that faith grows, grows abundantly and becomes more exalted. ...

Thietland of Einsiedeln

AD 1000
Indeed, we must note that in the first letter he does not say 'we ought to give thanks,' but 'we give thanks.' For truly there is a greater virtue in what he says, 'we ought to give thanks,' because indeed somebody can freely give thanks for some thing; but truly he who says that he ought, shows that he, too, is a debtor. Therefore the Apostle shows that he, too, is a debtor. because your faith is increasing greatly, and because the charity of each of you toward one another is abundant Certainly with these words they show the connection and narration of the first letter, since they show to them the progress of the same persons, in order that they might love the good things which they were more devotedly doing. In this act preachers are instructed that, while they know that their hearers have made progress, they must desire to show to them the same progress. To the extent that they give attention to their own progress, they should also love more firmly the good things which they do,...

Thomas Aquinas

AD 1274
'we ought to give thanks,' Paul mentions things that ought to be present in thanksgiving. First, thanksgiving should be directed to God: we give thanks always to God. “He bestows favor and honor” (Ps. 84:11). “Every good endowment and every perfect gift is from above, coming down from the Father of lights” (Jas. 1: 17). Thanksgiving should be unceasing; so Paul says, always. ...

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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