2 Corinthians 4:1

Therefore seeing we have this ministry, as we have received mercy, we faint not;
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Ambrosiaster

AD 400
Paul attributes his perseverance not to human merit but to the mercy of God, which first cleanses a person, then makes him righteous, adopts him as a son of God and endows him with a glory like the glory of God’s own Son. Commentary on Paul’s Epistles.

Cornelius a Lapide

AD 1637
SYNOPSIS OF THE CHAPTER i. From what was said in the last chapter of the glory and honour belonging to the office of a preacher of the Gospel, S. Paul proceeds to assert that he discharges that office holily, sincerely, and blamelessly. He declares this to be a fact plainly known to all except to those whose minds were blinded. ii. He declares (ver7) that he and the other Apostles undergo many sufferings on behalf of the Gospel without flinching, and that they with fortitude always bear about in their bodies the mortification of Jesus, on account of the hope of resurrection to a better life. iii. He points out (ver17) that this our tribulation is but light and short lived, and works an eternal weight of glory. ...

Cornelius a Lapide

AD 1637
Therefore seeing we have this ministry. The ministry of the New Testament, the excellency of which has been dwelt on in the preceding chapter. To this God in His mercy has called us, His unworthy Apostles. We faint not. We do not yield, are not daunted by dangers and difficulties, are not wearied, as Erasmus turns it. ...

George Leo Haydock

AD 1849
The apostle, having in the last chapter shown the excellence of his ministry above that of the law, proceeds to inform them of his own labours in order to destroy the credit which the false teachers had acquired amongst the Corinthians, and to caution them against any attempts that these teachers might make to destroy what had caused St. Paul so much trouble to effect. But he still refers all to God. As for these false teachers, what Churches had they founded? what persecutions have they endured? (Calmet) ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
Therefore seeing we have this ministry, even as we obtained mercy we faint not, but we have renounced the hidden things of shame. Seeing he had uttered great things and had set himself and all the faithful before Moses, aware of the height and greatness of what he had said, observe how he moderates his tone again. For it was necessary on account of the false Apostles to exalt his hearers also, and again to calm down that swelling; yet not to do it away, since this would be a trifler's part. Wherefore he manages this in another manner, by showing that not of their own merits was it, but all of the loving-kindness of God. Wherefore also he says, Therefore seeing we have this ministry. For nothing more did we contribute, except that we became ministers, and made ourselves subservient to the things given by God. Wherefore he said not 'largess ,' nor 'supply ,' but 'ministry.' Nor was he contented with this even, but added, as we obtained mercy. For even this itself, he says, the ministe...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
This perseverance is to be attributed to God’s loving kindness, for not only do we not sink down under the weight of all our trials, but we even rejoice and speak boldly.

Tertullian of Carthage

AD 220
Peace to an incestuous fornicator, he should forthwith have proceeded to accumulate exhortations about turning away from impurities, about pruning away of blemishes, about exhortations to deeds of sanctity, as if he had decreed nothing of a contrary nature just before? Compare, in short, (and see) whether it be his province to say, "Wherefore, having this ministration, in accordance with (the fact) that we have obtained mercy, we faint not; but renounce the secret things of disgrace" ...

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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