1 Corinthians 5:11

But now I have written unto you not to keep company, if any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner; with such a one no not to eat.
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Ambrosiaster

AD 400
Note that none of this applies to relations with unbelievers. Commentary on Paul’s Epistles.

Clement Of Alexandria

AD 215
Thus the apostle, in his solicitude for us, discriminates in the case of entertainments, saying, that "if any one called a brother be found a fornicator, or an adulterer, or an idolater, with such an one not to eat; ". Unde prae clare Apostolus: "Scripsi "inquit, "vobis in epistola, non conversari cure fornicator bus"

Cornelius a Lapide

AD 1637
If any man that is called a brother be a fornicator. This admits of being rendered, "If any man that is a brother be called a fornicator." Hence S. Augustine (contra Parmen. lib. iii. c2) says: "Is called," i.e, is judged and declared guilty of fornication. Or covetous . . . or an extortioner. The first word here denoted one who stealthily seizes others" goods by fraud, the second one who seizes them by open violence. But the miser who clings to his money too tenaciously will not be excluded from heaven, unless he refuse to give alms to the poor in their great necessity: much less is he to be excluded from the society of the faithful. But the Apostle orders this in this verse. Therefore "covetous," as I said, must mean a thief of robber. Cf. 2 Corinthians 7:2 and 2 Corinthians 12:18.

Fabian of Rome

AD 250
In like manner keep yourselves separate from all those of whom the apostle makes mention when he says, "with such persons, no, not to eat; ". Those also are to be dealt with in like manner of whom he says, "With such persons, no, not to eat; "

Ignatius of Antioch

AD 108
A destroyer of the vineyard of Christ. Have no fellowship

Irenaeus of Lyons

AD 202
And we have the precept: "If any man that is called a brother be a fornicator, or covetous, or an idolater, or a railer, or a drunkard, or an extortioner, with such an one no not to eat."

Tertullian of Carthage

AD 220
I shall not be sorry to meet him, and before anything else to point out to him the force of the law figuratively interpreted, which, in this example of a leper (who was not to be touched, but was rather to be removed from all intercourse with others), prohibited any communication with a person who was defiled with sins, with whom the apostle also forbids us even to eat food. And are to be excluded from all communication with the brotherhood, in accordance with the letter of the apostle, who says that "with persons of that kind there is to be no taking of food even."

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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