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Titus 1:9

Holding fast the faithful word as he has been taught, that he may be able by sound doctrine both to exhort and to refute the opposition.
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Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
If anyone says, however, that if teachers are made learned by the Holy Spirit then they do not need to be taught by educators what they should say or how they should say it, he should also say that we should not pray because the Lord says, “for your Father knows what is needful for you, before you ask him.” With such a false premise one might argue that the apostle Paul should not have taught Timothy and Titus what or how they should teach others. One upon whom is imposed the personage of a teacher in the church should have these three apostolic epistles before his eyes. Do we not read in the first epistle to Timothy … and in the second epistle is it not said … again, does he not say to Titus that a bishop should persevere in “that faithful word which is according to doctrine, that he may be able to exhort in sound doctrine and to convince the gainsayers”? On Christian Doctrine. ...

Jerome

AD 420
To Titus he gives commandment that among a bishop’s other virtues [which he briefly describes] he should be careful to seek a knowledge of the Scriptures. A bishop, he says, must hold fast “the faithful word as he has been taught that he may be able by sound doctrine both to exhort and to convince the gainsayers.” In fact, want of education in a clergyman prevents him from doing good to any one but himself. Even if the virtue of his life may build up Christ’s church, he does it an injury as great by failing to resist those who are trying to pull it down. ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
You see what intensity of virtue he required. Not given to filthy lucre, that is, showing great contempt for money. A lover of hospitality, a lover of good men, sober, just, holy; he means, giving away all his substance to them that need. Temperate; he speaks not here of one who fasts, but of one who commands his passions, his tongue, his hands, his eyes. For this is temperance, to be drawn aside by no passion. Holding fast the faithful word as he has been taught. By faithful is here meant true, or that which was delivered through faith, not requiring reasonings, or questionings. Holding fast, that is, having care of it, making it his business. What then, if he be ignorant of the learning that is without? For this cause, he says, the faithful word, according to teaching. That he may be able both to exhort, and to convince the gainsayers. So that there is need not of pomp of words, but of strong minds, of skill in the Scriptures and of powerful thoughts. Do you not see that Pa...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
“For the bishop,” he says, “must hold to the faithful word which is according to the teaching, that he may be able to convict even the gainsayers.” How, then, if he is inexperienced at speaking, as they say, will he be able to convict the objectors and to stop their mouths? If it is permissible to welcome such inexperience in the episcopacy, then why should any church leader bother to read books and study the Scriptures? This is all just a pretense and excuse and a pretext for carelessness and indolence. ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
There is need not of pomp of words but of strong minds, of skill in the Scriptures and of powerful thoughts. Do you not see that Paul put to flight the whole world, that he was more powerful than Plato and all the rest?.

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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