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Psalms 8:8

The fowl of the air, and the fish of the sea, and whatsoever passes through the paths of the seas.
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Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
13. "Yea moreover," saith he, "the beasts of the field." The addition of "moreover" is by no means idle. First, because by beasts of the plain may be understood both sheep and oxen: so that, if goats are the beasts of rocky and mountainous regions, sheep may be well taken to be the beasts of the field. Accordingly had it been written even thus, "all sheep and oxen and beasts of the field;" it might be reasonably asked what beasts of the plain meant, since even sheep and oxen could be taken as such. But the addition of "moreover" besides, obliges us, beyond question, to recognise some difference or another. But under this word, "moreover," not only "beasts of the field," but also "birds of the air, and fish of the sea, which walk through the paths of the sea" (ver. 8), are to be taken in. What is then this distinction? Call to mind the "wine-presses," holding husks and wine; and the threshing-floor, containing chaff and corn; and the nets, in which were enclosed good fish and bad; and t...

George Leo Haydock

AD 1849
Sea. All things are subjected to man's dominion., Genesis i. 26., and ix. 2. (Calmet) "The Stoics are in the right, who say that the world was made for us. For all its parts and productions are contrived for man's benefit. "(Lact. ira. xiii.)

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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