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Psalms 4:1

Hear me when I call, O God of my righteousness: you have delivered me when I was in distress; have mercy upon me, and hear my prayer.
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Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
TO The End, A Psalm Song TO David.

Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
1. "Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth." For this "end" signifies perfection, not consumption.Now it may be a question, whether every Song be a Psalm, or rather every Psalm a Song; whether there are some Songs which cannot be called Psalms, and some Psalms which cannot be called Songs. But the Scripture must be attended to, if haply "Song" do not denote a joyful theme. But those are called Psalms which are sung to the Psaltery; which the history as a high mystery declares the Prophet David to have used. Of which matter this is not the place to discourse; for it requires prolonged inquiry, and much discussion. Now meanwhile we must look either for the words of the Lord Man after the Resurrection, or of man in the Church believing and hoping on Him. ...

Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
2. "When I called, the God of my righteousness heard me" (ver. 1). When I called, God heard me, the Psalmist says, of whom is my righteousness. "In tribulation Thou hast enlarged me." Thou hast led me from the straits of sadness into the broad ways of joy. For, "tribulation and straitness is on every soul of man that doeth evil." But he who says, "We rejoice in tribulations, knowing that tribulation worketh patience;" up to that where he says, "Because the love of God is shed abroad in our hearts by the Holy Ghost, which is given unto us;" he hath no straits of heart, they be heaped on him outwardly by them that persecute him. Now the change of person, for that from the third person, where he says, "He heard," he passes at once to the second, where he says, "Thou hast enlarged me;" if it be not done for the sake of variety and grace, it is strange why the Psalmist should first wish to declare to men that he had been heard, and afterwards address Him who heard him. Unless perchance, whe...

George Leo Haydock

AD 1849
The God. Hebrew, "When I call, hear me, O God of my justice: "source and witness of my virtue. If I have offended thee, I have done no wrong to my rebellious son and his adherents. Many copies read Cum invocarem te, exaudisti me. (Calmet) Thou. The change of persons intimates that when God is present (St. Augustine) the soul is animated with confidence to speak to him. (Haydock) Prayer. Though his request had been granted, he still continues to address God, as we ought to pray without ceasing, 1 Thessalonians v. 17. ...

George Leo Haydock

AD 1849
Unto the end. Or as St. Jerome renders it, victory to him that overcometh; which some understand of the chief musician; to whom they suppose the psalms, which bear that title, were given to be sung. We rather understand the psalms thus inscribed to refer to Christ, who is the end of the law, and the great Conqueror of death and hell; and to the New Testament. In verses, in car minibus. In the Hebrew, it is neginoth, supposed by some to be a musical instrument, with which this psalm was to be sung. For David, or to David, to David, that is, inspired to David himself, or to be sung by him. (Challoner) Lamnetseach, from nits each, "to push to an end "may signify (Haydock) to the end; and this sense is more noble than (Berthier) "To the precentor, or president. "(Calmet) Binginoth. (Haydock) "Over the female musicians. "(Calmet) "To the chief of the singers on stringed instruments. "(Duguet.) The psalms which have this title, relate to future times, and to the Church of Christ; (St....

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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