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Proverbs 7:22

He goes after her immediately, as an ox goes to the slaughter, or as a fool to the correction of the stocks;
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George Leo Haydock

AD 1849
Lamb. Protestants, "fool to the correction of the stocks "(Haydock) or "like a shackle (abs.) for the chastisement of a fool. "(Mont.) Interpreters have read different words. (Calmet) Sinners who have given way to temptations, are as inconsiderate as oxen, or birds which hasten to their own ruin. (Worthington) ...

Hippolytus of Rome

AD 235
The “cemphus” is a kind of wild sea-bird, which has so immoderate an impulse to sexual enjoyment, that its eyes seem to fill with blood in coition; and it often blindly falls into snares, or into the hands of men. To this, therefore, he compares the man who gives himself up to the harlot on account of his immoderate lust; or else on account of the insensate folly of the creature, for he, too, pursues his object like one senseless. And they say that this bird is so much pleased with foam, that if one should hold foam in his hand as he sails, it will sit upon his hand. And it also brings forth with pain. ...

Hippolytus of Rome

AD 235
The “cemphus”(The Hebrew word, rendered “straightway” in our version, is translated κεπφωθείς in the Septuagint, i.e., “ensnared like a cepphus.”  [Quasi agnus lasciviens, according to the Vulgate.]) is a kind of wild sea-bird, which has so immoderate an impulse to sexual enjoyment, that its eyes seem to fill with blood in coition; and it often blindly falls into snares, or into the hands of men.([If the “cemphus” of the text equals “cepphus” of note, then “cepphus” equals “cebus” or “cepus,” which equals κῆβος, a sort of monkey.  The “Kophim” of 1 Kings x. 22 seems to supply the root of the word. The κέπφος, however, is said to be a sea-bird “driven about by every wind,” so that it is equal to a fool. So used by Aristophanes.]) To this, therefore, he compares the man who gives himself up to the harlot on account of his immoderate lust; or else on account of the insensate folly of the creature, for he, too, pursues his object like one senseless. And they say that this bird is so much p...

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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