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Matthew 6:13

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil: For yours is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory, forever. Amen.
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Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
We must consider and carefully set forth the respective and distinctive notes of those seven petitions. While our present life is passing away like time, our hope is fixed on the life eternal, and while we cannot reach the eternal without first passing through the present life, eternal things are first in importance. In addition, the fulfillment of the first three petitions has its beginning in the life that begins and ends in this world. For the hallowing of God’s name began with the advent of the Lord’s humility; and the coming of his kingdom—the coming in which he will appear in brightness—will be made manifest not after the end of the world but at the ending of the world; and the perfect fulfilling of God’s will on earth as in heaven—whether you take the words heaven and earth to mean the righteous and the sinful, or the spirit and the flesh, or the Lord and the church, or all of these together—will be fully achieved through the full attainment of our blessedness, and therefore at ...

Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
The sixth petition is, And bring us not into temptation. Some manuscripts have the word lead, which is, I judge, equivalent in meaning: for both translations have arisen from the one Greek word which is used. But many parties in prayer express themselves thus, Suffer us not to be led into temptation; that is to say, explaining in what sense the word lead is used. For God does not Himself lead, but suffers that man to be led into temptation whom He has deprived of His assistance, in accordance with a most hidden arrangement, and with his deserts. Often, also, for manifest reasons, He judges him worthy of being so deprived, and allowed to be led into temptation. But it is one thing to be led into temptation, another to be tempted. For without temptation no one can be proved, whether to himself, as it is written, He that has not been tempted, what manner of things does he know? or to another, as the apostle says, And your temptation in my flesh you despised not: for from this circumstance...
10 mins2/18

Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
Epist., 130, 11: This petition with which the Lord’s Prayer concludes is of such extent, that a Christian man in whatever tribulation cast, will in this petition utter groans, in this shed tears, here begin and here end his prayer. And therefore follows “Amen,” by which is expressed the strong desire of him that prays. Epist., 130, 12: And whatever other words we may use, either introductory to quicken the affections, or in conclusion to add to them, we say nothing more than is contained in the Lord’s Prayer if we pray rightly and connectedly. And if you thus go through all the words of the holy prayers, you will find nothing that is not contained in the Lord 'sprayer. Whoever then speaks such words as have no relation to this evangelic prayer, prays carnally; and such prayer I know not why we should not pronounce unlawful, seeing the Lord instructs those who are born again only to pray spiritually. But whoso in prayer says, Lord, increase my riches, add to my honours; and that from de...

Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
Serm. in Mont., ii, 9: Some copies read, “Carry us not,” an equivalent word, both being a translation of one Greek word, εισενενχεις.Many in interpreting say, ‘Suffer us not to be led into temptation,’ as being what is implied in the word, “lead.” For God does not of Himself lead a man, but suffer him to be led from whom He has withdrawn His aid. Epist., 130, 11: When then we say, “Lead us not into temptation,” what we askis, that we may not, deserted by His aid, either consent through the subtle snares, or yield to the forcible might, or any temptation. De Don. Pers., 5: When the Saints pray, “Lead us not into temptation,” what else do they pray for than that they may persevere in their sanctity. This once granted - and that it is God’s gift this, that of Him we ask it, shows - none of the Saints but holds to the end his abiding holiness; for none ceases tohold on his Christian profession, till he be first overtaken of temptation....

Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
“Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.” Will this, again, be necessary in the life to come? “Lead us not into temptation” will not be said except where there can be temptation. We read in the book of holy Job, “Is not the life of man upon earth a temptation?” What, then, do we pray for? Hear what. The apostle James saith, “Let no man say when he is tempted, I am tempted of God.” He spoke of those evil temptations whereby men are deceived and brought under the yoke of the devil. This is the kind of temptation he spoke of. For there is another sort of temptation which is called a proving; of this kind of temptation it is written, “The Lord your God tempteth (proveth) you to know whether ye love Him.” What means “to know?” “To make you know,” for He knoweth already. With that kind of temptation whereby we are deceived and seduced, God tempteth no man. What, then, has He hereby taught us? To fight against our lusts. For ye are about to put away your sins in holy baptism...

Cyprian of Carthage

AD 258
After all those things, in the prayer’s summation there occurs a little clause concluding all our petitions and prayer in succinct fashion. For at the very last we state “but deliver us from evil,” understanding the phrase to mean all adversities that the enemy undertakes against us in this world. There can be strong and faithful protection against these adversities if God delivers us, if, as we pray and implore, he furnishes us his aid. Moreover, when we say “deliver us from evil,” nothing remains for which we should ask still further. When once we seek God’s protection against evil, having obtained this, we stand secure and safe against all the works of the devil and of the world. For what fear, indeed, is there with regard to the world for one who has God as protector in the world? Treatises, On the Lord’s Prayer ...

Cyprian of Carthage

AD 258
Tr. vii, 17: Herein it is shown that the adversary can nothing avail against us, unless God first permit him; so that all our fear and devotion ought to be addressed to God. And in so praying we are cautioned of our own infirmity and weakness, lest any presumptuously exalt himself; that while a humble and submissive confession comes first, and all is referred to God, whatever we suppliantly apply for mayby His gracious favour be supplied. ...
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Cyprian of Carthage

AD 258
Moreover, the Lord of necessity admonishes us to say in prayer, And suffer us not to be led into temptation. In which words it is shown that the adversary can do nothing against us except God shall have previously permitted it; so that all our fear, and devotion, and obedience may be turned towards God, since in our temptations nothing is permitted to evil unless power is given from Him. This is proved by divine Scripture, which says, Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon came to Jerusalem, and besieged it; and the Lord delivered it into his hand. 2 Kings 24:11 But power is given to evil against us according to our sins, as it is written, Who gave Jacob for a spoil, and Israel to those who make a prey of Him? Did not the Lord, against whom they sinned, and would not walk in His ways, nor hear His law? And He has brought upon them the anger of His wrath. Isaiah 13:24 And again, when Solomon sinned, and departed from the Lord's commandments and ways, it is recorded, And the Lord stirred up Sata...
15 mins8/18

Cyprian of Carthage

AD 258
Tr. vii. 18: After all these preceding petitions, at the conclusion of the prayer comes a sentence, comprising shortly and collectively the whole of our petitions and desires. For there remains nothing beyond for us to ask for, after petition made for God’s protection from evil; for that gained, we stand secure and safe against all things that the Devil and the world work against us. What fear hath he from this life, who has God through life for his guardian?. We need not wonder, dearest brethren, that this is God’s prayer, seeing how His instruction comprises all our petitioning, in one saving sentence. This had already been prophesied by Isaiah the Prophet, “A short word will God make in the whole earth.” For when our Lord Jesus Christ came unto all, and gather together the learned alike and the unlearned, did to every sex and age set forth the precepts of salvation, He made a full compendium of His instructions, that the memory of the scholars might not labour in the heavenly discip...

George Leo Haydock

AD 1849
God is not the tempter of evil, or author of sin. (James i. 13.) He tempteth no man: we pray that he would not suffer the devil to tempt us above our strength: that he would remove the temptations, or enable us to overcome them, and deliver us from evil, particularly the evil of sin, which is the first, and the greatest, and the true efficient cause of all evils. (Haydock) In the Greek we here read, for thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory; which words are found in some old Greek liturgies, and there is every appearance that they have thence slipped into the text of St. Matthew. They do not occur in St. Luke (vi. 4.), nor in any one of the old Latin copies, nor yet in the most ancient of the Greek texts. The holy Fathers prior to St. Chrysostom, as Grotius observes, who have explained the Lord's prayer, never mention these words. And not being found in Tertullian, St. Cyprian, St. Jerome, St. Ambrose, St. Augustine, nor in the Vatican Greek copy, nor in the Cambridge ma...

Jerome

AD 420
“Amen,” which appears here at the close, is the seal of the Lord’s Prayer. Aquila rendered ‘faithfully’ - we may perhaps ‘truly.’
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John Chrysostom

AD 407
As He had above put many high things into men’s mouths, teaching them to call God their Father, to pray that His kingdom might come; so now He adds a lesson of humility, when He says, “and lead us not into temptation.”
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John Chrysostom

AD 407
Jesus here calls the devil “the wicked one,” commanding us to wage against him a war that knows no truce. Yet he is not evil by nature, for evil is not something derived from any nature as created but is what has been added to nature by choice. The devil is the prototypically evil one, because of the excess of his evil choices and because he who in no respect was injured by us wages against us an implacable war. Thus we do not pray “deliver us from the wicked ones” in the plural but “from the wicked one.” The Gospel of Matthew, Homily ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
Having made us anxious by the mention of our enemy, in this that He has said, "Deliver us from evil,” He again restores confidence by that which is added insome copies, “For thine is the kingdom, and the power, and the glory,” since if His be the kingdom, none need fear, since even he who fights against us, must be His subject. But since His power and glory are infinite, He can not only deliver from evil, but also make glorious. This is also connected with the foregoing. “Thine is the kingdom” has reference to “Thy kingdom come,” that none should therefore say, “God has no kingdom onearth. The power,” answers to “Thy will be done, as in earth so in heaven, "that none should say thereon that God cannot perform whatever He would. “And the glory,” answers to all that follows, in which God’s glory is shown forth. ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
Here He teaches us plainly our own vileness, and quells our pride, instructing us to deprecate all conflicts, instead of rushing upon them. For so both our victory will be more glorious, and the devil's overthrow more to be derided. I mean, that as when we are dragged forth, we must stand nobly; so when we are not summoned, we should be quiet, and wait for the time of conflict; that we may show both freedom from vainglory, and nobleness of spirit. And He here calls the devil the wicked one, commanding us to wage against him a war that knows no truce, and implying that he is not such by nature. For wickedness is not of those things that are from nature, but of them that are added by our own choice. And he is so called pre-eminently, by reason of the excess of his wickedness, and because he, in no respect injured by us, wages against us implacable war. Wherefore neither said He, deliver us from the wicked ones, but, from the wicked one; instructing us in no case to entertain displeasu...
3 mins15/18

Tertullian of Carthage

AD 220
To complete the prayer that was so well arranged, Christ added that we should pray not only that our sins be forgiven but also that they be resisted completely: “Lead us not into temptation,” that is, do not allow us to be led by the tempter. God forbid that our Lord should seem to be the tempter, as if he were not aware of one’s faith or were eager to upset it! That weakness and spitefulness belongs to the devil. For even in the case of Abraham, God had ordered the sacrifice of his son not to tempt his faith but to prove it. In him he might illustrate that which he was later to teach, that no one should hold loved ones dearer than God. … The disciples were so tempted to desert their Lord that they indulged in sleep instead of prayer. Therefore the phrase that balances and interprets “lead us not into temptation” is “but deliver us from evil.” , ...

Tertullian of Carthage

AD 220
To complete the prayer which was so well arranged, Christ added that we should pray not only that our sins be forgiven, but that they be shunned completely: 'Lead us not into temptation,' that is, do not allow us to be led by the Tempter. God forbid that our Lord should seem to be the tempter, as if He were not aware of one's faith or were eager to upset it! That weakness and spitefulness belongs to the Devil. For, even in the case of Abraham, God had ordered the sacrifice of his son not to tempt his faith, but to prove it, that in him He-might set forth an example for His precept whereby He was later to teach that no one should hold his loved ones dearer than God. Christ Himself was tempted by the Devil and pointed out the subtle director of the temptation. This passage He confirms (by His words to His Apostles) later when He says: 'Pray that you may not enter into temptation.' They were so tempted to desert their Lord because they had indulged in sleep instead of prayer. Th...

Theophylact of Ochrid

AD 1107
We humans are weak and therefore we should not throw ourselves into temptations. But when we have fallen into temptation, we should pray that we not be swallowed up by it. For he who has been led into the very depth of temptation is the one who has been swallowed up and defeated by temptation. But it is different for him who merely fell into temptation, and then conquered it. He did not say, from evil men, for it is not they who do us harm, but the devil. Here He emboldens us for if our Father is King, powerful and glorious, then certainly we too will defeat the evil one and we will then be made glorious. ...

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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