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Matthew 26:52

Then said Jesus unto him, Put up again your sword into its place: for all they that take the sword shall perish with the sword.
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Cornelius a Lapide

AD 1637
Then Jesus saith to him, Put up again thy sword into his place. Christ here reproves Peter"s rashness in drawing his sword against His wish. Peter"s sin, then, was twofold: first in striking against Christ"s wish, and next, because this was an act not so much of defence as of revenge, which did not help to deliver Christ from the soldiers, but rather excited them the more against Him. But Peter, says S. Chrysostom, was hurried on by his eagerness to protect Christ, and did not think of this, but remembered rather His words, that Christ had ordered them to take two swords, inferring that it was for His defence. And accordingly he thought that in striking the servant he was acting according to the mind of Christ, "Let revenge cease, let patience be exhibited," says the Interlinear Gloss. For all they that take the sword (without proper authority). To strike, i.e, and wound others. To take the sword by public authority to punish the guilty, or in a just war, is lawful and honest. Shall ...

George Leo Haydock

AD 1849
Shall perish by the sword. This was not to condemn the use of the sword, when employed on a just cause, or by lawful authority. Euthymius looks upon it as a prophecy that the Jews should perish by the sword of the Romans. (Witham) Our divine Saviour would not permit this apostle to continue in his pious zeal for the safety of his Master. He says to him: put up thy sword. For he could not be unwilling to die for the redemption of man, who chose to be born for that end alone. Now, therefore, he gives power to his implacable enemies to treat him in the most cruel manner, not willing that the triumph of the cross should be in the least deferred; the dominion of the devil and man's captivity in the least prolonged. (St. Leo) ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
But whence were the swords there? They had come forth from the supper, and from the table. It was likely also there should be swords because of the lamb, and that the disciples, hearing that certain were coming forth against Him, took them for defense, as meaning to fight in behalf of their Master, which was of their thought only. Wherefore also Peter is rebuked for using it, and with a severe threat. For he was resisting the servant who came, warmly indeed, yet not defending himself, but doing this in behalf of his Master. Christ however suffered not any harm to ensue. For He healed him, and showed forth a great miracle, enough to indicate at once both His forbearance and His power, and the affection and meekness of His disciple. For then he acted from affection, now with dutifulness. For when he heard, Put up your sword into its sheath, John 18:11 he obeyed straightway, and afterwards nowhere does this. But another says, that they moreover asked, Shall we smite? Luke 22:49 but ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
Who was this “one” who cut off the ear? John says it was Peter. For this was an act of fervor. Another point deserves inquiry: Why were the disciples bearing swords? That they indeed bore swords is evident from the text both here and in the other accounts. But why did Christ even permit them to have swords? For Luke affirms also that “one of them struck the servant of the high priest, cutting off his right ear,” remembering that in Luke Jesus had said to them, “When I sent you without purse, traveling bag and shoes, did you lack anything?” And when they said, “Nothing,” he said to them, “But now, he that has a purse, let him take it, and a bag, and he that has no sword, let him sell his garment, and buy one.” And when they said, “Here are two swords,” he said to them, “It is enough.” So why did they have swords? Because he had said to them, “Let him buy a sword.” Yet this was not meant that they should arm themselves, far from it, but to indicate that he was to be betrayed. The swords ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
Peter is rebuked for using his sword and for his severe threat. He was resisting the servant who came indeed with hostility. He was not defending himself but doing this on behalf of his Master. Christ however did not permit any harm to ensue. For he healed [the servant] and manifested a great miracle, enough to indicate at once both his forbearance and his power and the affection and meekness of his disciple. Peter had acted from affection. Now he acts from duty. For when he heard, “Put your sword back into its place,” he obeyed immediately. The Gospel of Matthew, Homily ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
One of his followers, in another account, asked, “Lord should we strike with our swords?” But it is clear in all accounts that he rejected it and healed the man and rebuked his disciple in such a way that he might move him to acquiescence. “For all who take the sword will perish by the sword.” Then he adds, “Do you think that I cannot appeal to my Father, and he will at once send me more than twelve legions of angels? But how then should the Scriptures be fulfilled, that it must be so?” By these words he quenched their anger, appealing to holy Scripture. He prayed that the disciples might accept meekly whatever befell him when they had learned that this also is occurring according to God’s will. His response is twofold: He is able to appeal to his Father, and he is able to resist the angry passions of his supposed defenders with these words: “All who take the sword will perish by the sword.” The Gospel of Matthew, Homily ...

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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