1 Timothy 6:7

For we brought nothing into this world, and it is certain we can carry nothing out.
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Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
But the world retains its hold on us. On all sides its charms decoy us. We like lots of money, we like splendid honors, we like power to overawe others. We like all these things, but let’s listen to the apostle, “We brought nothing into this world, neither can we take anything out.” Honor should be looking for you, not you for it. You, after all, should sit down in the humbler place, so he that invited you may make you go up to a more honored place. But if he doesn’t wish to, eat where you are sitting, because you brought nothing into this world. ...

Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
We neither take nor snatch anything away with us. What if we could take something—wouldn’t we be devouring people alive? What is this monstrously avid appetite, when even huge beasts know their limits? The time they pounce on something, you see, is when they are hungry; but when they feel satisfied, they spare their prey. It is only the avarice and greed of the rich that is forever insatiable. ...

Cyprian of Carthage

AD 258
For the love of money is the root of all evil; which while some coveted after, they have made shipwreck from the faith, and have pierced themselves through with many sorrows.". For covetousness is a root of all evils, which some desiring, have made shipwreck from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.". For the root of all evils is covetousness, which some coveting, have made shipwreck from the faith, and have plunged themselves in many sorrows." ...

Gregory The Dialogist

AD 604
And the man himself, however unwillingly, is doomed to die, and return to earth in the selfsame condition in which it was his lot once to come into being.

John Chrysostom

AD 407
For there is no one free, save only one who lives for Christ. He stands superior to all troubles. And if he does not choose to injure himself, no one else will be able to do this, for he is impregnable. He is not stung by the loss of wealth, for he has learned that we “brought nothing into this world, neither can we carry anything out.” He is not caught by the longings of ambition or glory, for he has learned that our citizenship is in heaven. No one annoys him by abuse or provokes him by blows. There is only one calamity for a Christian: disobedience to God. All the other things, such as loss of property, exile, peril of life, one does not even reckon to be a grievance at all. And that which all dread, departure hence to the other world—this is to him sweeter than life itself. ...

Polycarp of Smyrna

AD 155
Knowing, therefore, that "as we brought nothing into the world, so we can carry nothing out"

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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