1 Timothy 6:10

For the love of money is the root of all evil: which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows.
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Ambrose of Milan

AD 397
How happy is the man who has been able to cut out the root of vices, avarice. Surely he will not dread this balance. Avarice generally dulls men’s senses and corrupts their judgments, so that they think piety a gain, and money a sort of reward for sagacity. But great is the reward of piety and the gaining of sobriety. The possession of these virtues is sufficient. ...
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Ambrose of Milan

AD 397
Therefore the man of good counsel says, “I have learned in whatever state I am to be content.” For he knew that the root of all evils is the love of money. Therefore he was content with what he had, without seeking for what was another’s. Sufficient for me, he says, is what I have. Whether I have little or much, to me it is much. . ...
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Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
So love God, and love your neighbor as yourself. I mean, I can see that you love yourself, because you love God. Charity is the root of all good works. Just as greed, after all, is the root of all evil, so charity is the root of all good things. ..
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Augustine of Hippo

AD 430
For when the soul loves its own power, it slips from the common whole to its own particular part. Had it followed God as its ruler in the universal creature, it could have been most excellently governed by his laws. But in that apostatizing pride, which is called “the beginning of sin,” it sought for something more than the whole; and while it struggled to govern it by its own laws, it was thrust into caring for a part, since there is nothing more than the whole. So by desiring something more, it becomes less, and for this reason covetousness is called “the root of all evils.” . ...

Clement Of Alexandria

AD 215
Poverty of heart is the true wealth, and the true nobility is not that founded on riches but that which comes from a contempt for riches. It is disgraceful to boast about one’s possessions. Not to be concerned about them any longer very clearly proves the just man. .
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Clement Of Alexandria

AD 215
But now love of money is found to be the stronghold of evil, which the apostle says "is the root of all evils, which, while some coveted, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows."
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Clement Of Rome

AD 99
"the love of money (which is the root of all evils); "
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George Leo Haydock

AD 1849
The root of all evils is covetousness, or the love of money, as it is in the Greek; a covetous man being ready to sacrifice his soul for money. (Witham) This truth is verified and illustrated by the example of Judas, in the gospel; of Ananias and Saphira, in the Acts; of Demas, mentioned by St. Paul in his second epistle to Timothy; and many others, who have made shipwreck of their faith through eagerness to gain riches. Whoever seeks visible and terrestrial goods with great avidity, cannot be supposed to retain much faith in things that are celestial and invisible. He quits a future real and substantial good to seek for a delusive happiness that presents itself, but which will prove a source of present and future evils. ...

Gregory of Nyssa

AD 394
The tree, then, from which comes this fruit of mixed knowledge is among those things which are forbidden. Its fruit is combined of opposite qualities, and therefore for this reason perhaps has the serpent to commend it. For the evil is not exposed in its nakedness, thereby appearing in its own proper nature; for wickedness would surely fail of its effect were it not decked with some fair color to entice to the desire of it him whom it deceives. But now the nature of evil is in a manner mixed and thus keeps destruction like some snare concealed in its depths and displays some phantom of good in the deceitfulness of its exterior. The beauty of the substance seems good to those who love money. ...

John Chrysostom

AD 407
The man who possesses nothing as if he had everything disdains all. He is very outspoken with officials, and rulers, and the sovereign. For by despising possessions and advancing methodically, he will scorn even death with ease. Since he is above these things, he will speak openly with everyone and tremble with fear before no one. But the man who has devoted himself to money is a slave to it and also to his reputation, honor, the present life, in short, to all human concerns. Consequently, Paul has called it the root of all evil. ...
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John Chrysostom

AD 407
What evils does it not cause! What fraudulent practices, what robberies! What miseries, enmities, contentions, battles! Does it not stretch forth its hand even to the dead, even to fathers and brothers? Do not they who are possessed by this passion violate the laws of nature and the commandments of God? In short everything? Is it not this that renders our courts of justice necessary? Take away therefore the love of money, and you put an end to war, to battle, to enmity, to strife and contention. ...
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John Chrysostom

AD 407
In many places Paul covertly signifies this point: a corrupt life is the parent of evil doctrines. “The love of money is the root of all kinds of evil, which some reaching after, have been led astray from the faith.” Indeed, many of those who are conscious of wickedness and would prefer not to pay its penalty are by this fear damaged also in their faith concerning the resurrection. This can happen even when they on a daily basis are virtuously desiring to behold the resurrection. ...
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John Chrysostom

AD 407
For the love of money is the root of all evil; which while some coveted after, they have erred from the faith, and pierced themselves through with many sorrows. Two things he mentions, and that which to them might seem the more weighty he places last, their many sorrows. And to learn how true this is, the only way is to sojourn with the rich, to see how many are their sorrows, how bitter their complaints. ...
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Polycarp of Smyrna

AD 155
"But the love of money is the root of all evils."
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Tertullian of Carthage

AD 220
If we think over the rest of faults, tracing them from their generations, let us begin with covetousness, "a root of all evils". Of that, therefore, which we have not the smallest need to seek after, because the Lord did not seek after it either, we ought to endure without heart-sickness the cutting down or taking away. "Covetousness "the Spirit of the Lord has through the apostle pronounced "a root of all evils." ...
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Urbanus I

AD 230
For to what, most dearly beloved, does the wisdom of this world urge us, but to seek things that are hurtful, and to love things that are to perish, and to neglect things that are healthful, and to esteem as of no value things that are lasting? It commends the love of money, of which it is said, The love of money is the root of all evil; ...
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Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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