1 Corinthians 8:5

For though there be those called gods, whether in heaven or in earth, (as there be gods many, and lords many,)
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Cornelius a Lapide

AD 1637
For though there be that are called gods, . . . to us there is but one God, &c. The pagans have gods many and lords many, as the sun, moon, and stars, or terrestrial gods, as Jupiter, Apollo, Hercules; but we have only one God, for whose glory and honour we were created. Notice also against the Arians that, when S. Paul says One God, he is only excluding false gods, not the Son and the Holy Spirit. When he says One Lord Jesus Christ, he is only excluding false lords, not the Father and the Holy Spirit. ...

George Leo Haydock

AD 1849
Many gods Reputed for such among the heathens. (Challoner)

John Chrysostom

AD 407
5. For though there be that are called gods, whether in heaven or on earth, as there are gods many and lords many; yet to us there is one God, the Father, of Whom are all things, and we unto Him; and one Lord Jesus Christ, through Whom are all things, and we through Him. Since he had said, that an idol is nothing and that there is no other God; and yet there were idols and there were those that were called gods; that he might not seem to be contradicting plain facts, he goes on to say, For though there be that are called gods, as indeed there are; not absolutely, there are; but, called, not in reality having this but in name: be it in heaven or on earth:— in heaven, meaning the sun and the moon and the remainder of the choir of stars; for these too the Greeks worshipped: but upon the earth demons, and all those who had been made gods of men:— yet to us there is One God, the Father. In the first instance having expressed it without the word Father, and said, there is no God but one, he ...

Tertullian of Carthage

AD 220
For the name of God, as being the natural designation of Deity, may be ascribed to all those beings for whom a divine nature is claimed,-as, for instance, even to idols. The apostle says: "For there be that are called gods, whether in heaven or in earth.". that no Christian should intermarry with a heathen, he maintains a law of the Creator, who everywhere prohibits marriage with strangers. But when he says, "although there be that are called gods, whether in l heaven or in earth". has become a common name (since in the world there are said and believed to be "gods many". For "although there be that are called gods "in name, "whether in heaven or in earth, yet to us there is but one God the Father, of whom are all things; " ...

Knowing this first, that no prophecy of the scripture is of any private interpretation. - 2 Peter 1:20

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